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College of Education, Human Development joining U.S. push for more quality educators

Individuals collaborating on the educational initiative include, left, JSU’s LeMia Jenkins; Dr. Roy Jones of Clemson University; JSU’s Felicia Kent, Congressman Bennie Thompson; JSU’s Dr. Tamika Bradley; and JSU’s Dr. Juette Bingham.

Individuals collaborating on the educational initiative include, left, Jackson State University’s LeMia Jenkins; Dr. Roy Jones of Clemson University; JSU’s Felicia Kent, Congressman Bennie Thompson; JSU’s Dr. Tamika Bradley; and JSU’s Dr. Juette Bingham.

A team from Jackson State University recently traveled to Washington, D.C., to enhance strategic partnerships for producing quality educators for the next era.

JSU’s College of Education and Human Development representatives met with the White House Initiatives on Historically Black College and Universities, the U.S. Department of Education Office of the Secretary, U.S. Sen. Thad Cochran and Congressman Bennie G. Thompson.

Discussions included teacher preparation, the Call Me MISTER (Mentors Instructing Students Toward Effective Role Models) Program, Teach for Mississippi Initiative, future funding opportunities and collaborative partnerships.

Mississippi’s  urban university has a rich history in teacher education that began even before the state assumed support of its mission to train teachers in 1940 and has grown to become one of the largest producers of African-American educators in the nation. The College of Education and Human Development has played a major role growing and producing quality educators to meet societal demands in a globally competitive environment.

JSU’s College of Education and Human Development coordinates with Clemson University on the Call Me MISTER Program. The collaborative seeks to increase the effectiveness and diversity in teaching, especially among men of color. JSU and Clemson held a meeting with the U.S. Department of Education Office of the Secretary and the White House Initiatives on Historically Black College and Universities to provide an overview of the program, and offered itself as a solution for addressing issues of diversity in the teaching profession.

The team has been replicating positive results in classroom settings and increasing visibility and national awareness for the most vulnerable student.  This work aligns with the administration’s priorities around the teaching force and how it could be held up as a national model for training and recruitment.

Attendees:

Jackson State University
Dr. Daniel Watkins, dean, College of Education and Human Development (via phone)
Dr. Tamika Bradley, interim associate dean, College of Education and Human Development
Dr. Millard Bingham, interim associate dean, College of Education and Human Development

Felicia W. Kent,  director of development, Division of Institutional Advancement
LeMia Jenkins, director of federal relations

Clemson University
Dr. Roy Jones, Executive Director, Call Me Mister

U.S. Department of Education
Ruthanne Buck, Senior Adviser, Office of the Secretary
Dr. Cynthia Cole, Senior Adviser, Office of the Undersecretary
Rev. Brenda Girton-Mitchell, Executive Director, White House Initiative, Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships
Lauren Mims, Assistant Director, White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African Americans
Jaye Espy, Chief of Staff, White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Mia Long, Policy Adviser, White House Initiative on American Indian and Alaska Native Education
Eric Duncan, LEE Public Policy Fellow, Office of the Secretary
Dr. Bryant Marks, Senior Fellow, White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Joeletta Patrick, NASA Minority University Research and Education Project Manager detailed as Senior Fellow, White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities