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JSUTV nets top honor for story on medical drones in Mississippi-Louisiana AP contest

DESTINY Alexander Byline

 

 

JSUTV ImageJSUTV was among a host of winners named recently in the 2016 Mississippi-Louisiana Associated Press broadcast competition in Jackson, including an honor that netted a top award in TV Division I for Mississippi in the multimedia story category.

The awards honored outstanding work in journalism and broadcasting for 2016.

The station took home awards in several categories:

  • 1st Place in Multimedia Story for “Medical Drones”: Eric Walker

  • 2nd Place in Public Affairs Reporting for “Deadly Police Chase”: Eric Walker

  • 3rd Place in Documentary for “Pro Life vs. Women’s Health”: Eric Walker

  • 3rd Place in Overall Achievement with “Jackson Airport Takeover”: Eric Walker, Darrell Lovett, Keith Collins

Of the first-place win, Walker, a senior producer and anchor for the weekday “Metro Morning Live,” said, “The story on medical drones is very important. Let’s say somebody in the woods encounters an emergency and police and firefighters can’t get there in a timely manner. Technology would allow kits to be flown to those in distress. Individuals needing help will be allowed to put on a headset to speak with a medical expert while emergency crews are in en route. The technology will help save lives.”

1st photo: JSUTV award winners are, left, producer Darrell Lovett, left, general manager Keith Collins and producer-anchor Eric Walker; 2nd photo: Beating out major stations throughout Mississippi and Louisiana, Walker displays his top award for a feature on “Medical Drones.” The technology allows health experts to speak with individuals in distress from a distant until emergency personnel arrives. (Photos by Kevin Bradley)

1st photo: JSUTV award winners are producer Darrell Lovett, left, general manager Keith Collins and producer-anchor Eric Walker; 2nd photo: Beating out major stations throughout Mississippi and Louisiana, Walker displays his top award for a feature on “Medical Drones.” The technology allows health experts to speak from a distance to individuals in distress until emergency personnel arrives. (Photos by Kevin Bradley)